Behind the Scenes: Talking Trim

If you’ve read my blog for any time, you know how much I believe that the details of a project can change everything. That’s why I’ve spent so much time considering the trim and baseboard that I want in my home. It isn’t the most exciting topic in interior design, but it’s something that really can change the entire look of your home. My home remodel has given me the chance to change the style of trim and molding in the house.

trad.jpg

Baseboards and trims protect the wall from damage, give you a transition between the flooring in the wall and are usually decorative, like the one above. Originally I had the typical transitional style baseboard that was 5 inches high, made of solid wood painted white; and the trim around the doors matched the baseboards. Traditional baseboard and trim sits on top of the sheetrock. The floor runs close to the sheetrock and the baseboard sits on top of the floor. Sheetrock shoe molding or quarter round is needed to hide the gaps between the sheetrock and floor.

Sumich Chaplin Architecture

Sumich Chaplin Architecture

But I’m going to change things up! I want to do a more modern or transitional style with a recessed baseboard that has a clean contemporary look, like the one above. This type of base is installed flush with the sheetrock.

Installation

Installation

To install the modern recessed or  flush baseboard can be tricky. This base has a couple of steps to achieve the clean look. Plywood is applied to the wall at height of desired base. This gives the sheetrocker a reference point to install the drywall.  A reglet is installed at the bottom of the sheetrock to give us the shadow line or gap. Once the reglet is installed, the floor goes in and runs underneath the sheetrock. A rabbit or curve cut is put on the back of the base, which will allow the reglet to dado into the trim and fit flush. There’s no need for shoe molding or quarter round. This really shows off the craftsmanship of a trim carpenter!

Door trim.

Door trim.

The door jam shown is an interesting detail. The door jams need to be installed before the drywall is installed. On traditional casing, the drywall is put up and then the trim is installed on top of the dry wall to hide the reveal. 

John Maniscalco Architecture

John Maniscalco Architecture

It’s an artisan touch that makes a huge impression! I can’t wait to show you the finished results in my home - tell me what you think about this idea in the comments below!

Warmly,

Beth